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Your libertarian credentials are obvious. Doubtlessly you will become more extreme as time goes on. January 5, 2007

Posted by Zack W. Handley in Familia y Amigos, freemarket, General Musings, Genuis, netneutrality, Politics.
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Your Libertarian Purity Score

Your score is…

45

What Your Score Means

0 points: You are not a libertarian by any stretch of the imagination. You are probably not even a liberal or a conservative. Just some Nazi nut, I guess.

1-5 points: You have a few libertarian notions, but overall you’re a statist.

6-15 points: You are starting to have libertarian leanings. Explore them.

16-30 points: You are a soft-core libertarian. With effort, you may harden and become pure.

31-50 points: Your libertarian credentials are obvious. Doubtlessly you will become more extreme as time goes on.

51-90 points: You are a medium-core libertarian, probably self-consciously so. Your friends probably encourage you to quit talking about your views so much.

91-130 points: You have entered the heady realm of hard-core libertarianism. Now doesn’t that make you feel worse that you didn’t get a perfect score?

131-159 points: You are nearly a perfect libertarian, with a tiny number of blind spots. Think about them, then take the test over again. On the other hand, if you scored this high, you probably have a good libertarian objection to my suggested libertarian answer. 🙂

160 points: Perfect! The world needs more like you.

Blast from the past…I came across this on a vanity search;-) January 5, 2007

Posted by Zack W. Handley in Best Stuff, Genuis, la familia.
1 comment so far

Seattle Times: Arts &Entertainment Zack Handley DotGone Guy Comic 2001

August 22, 2001
ILLUSTRATIONS BY BOO DAVIS / THE SEATTLE TIMES
August 22, 2001 Strip
A COUPLE OF DOT-GONE GUY STOCK OPTIONS GO TO READER ZACK HANDLEY, OF SEATTLE, WHO CONTRIBUTED TO TODAY’S STRIP. HELP US WRITE THE SCRIPT BY SHARING YOUR IDEAS AT TALKTOUS@SEATTLETIMES.COM OR WRITING DOT-GONE GUY, PO BOX 1845, SEATTLE, WA 98111.

Balanced NetNeutrality Debate Between the Father and Grandfather of the Internet (no joke) July 18, 2006

Posted by Zack W. Handley in Best Stuff, freemarket, Genuis, netneutrality, Politics.
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Vint Cerf and David Farber on
“What is Net Neutrality?” is available via podcast from the Center for
American Progress: feed (mp3).

I like hearing both sides of a debate, don’t you?

Net Neutrality, Not American May 20, 2006

Posted by Zack W. Handley in freemarket, General Musings, Genuis, Google, Microsoft, netneutrality, Search, Web 2.0.
5 comments

When Tim Berners-Lee started off with a French net neutrality example I knew his essay was in jeopardy. As the inventor of the internet (Sorry Gore) and working for Google, he definitely has a horse in this race however Net Neutrality is simply Not Free Market, Not Market Based and Not American.

If I make an investment in the future, take a risk, deploy capital, and build something better I should be able to charge a market rate for that product. RBOCs are not a great poster child for this debate because they were derived from a government created monopoly.

That was then, this is now.

If Comcast or SBC wants to charge Google, Yahoo or MSN more for streaming video or whathaveya they should be able to. Consumers will be able to switch providers if their current provider is too slow rendering their favorite sites.

The Market will Take Care of This.

Notice how quiet the big web — networking vendors are of course totally against any sort of net neutrality- companies have been regarding this. They don't want net neutrality because they think it will lock out start ups (thus keeping them at the top) and it could. However I think the SBCs of the world are more interested in Google, Yahoo and MSN at this point.

Life is not fair.

It never will be. However, consumers will have choices on their service provider and that should keep the Backbone companies honest. We will see. Socializing bandwidth will never be the answer. It doesn't promote innovation, and innovation is why we have the internet.